Post 1921 History

Post 808 Update (May 2017)

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Cadet Petty Officer first Class Rika Kihara receiving the SAMS JROTC award at our awards banquet at E. J. King HS in Sasebo, Japan on May 23, 2017 

 

Post 808 Update (April 2017)

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Mike Medeiros, Amanda Hess, Sita Menor, and Chuck Jamison at the SAMS Table at the Scottish Games in April.

 

Post 808 Update (April 2012)

SAMS Post 808 supported five high schools this year with SAMS representation

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Kaiser High School AF JROTC Precision Drill Team at their annual awards ceremony conducted at the Kanehoe Marine Base Officer’s Club.

 

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Juliet Cowell, Army JROTC from Waimea High School on the Big Island receiving her SAMS award.

 

Navy Vietnam Veteran recognized

The Celtic Pipes and Drums of Hawaii and SAMS members Howard Lavy and Sita Menor, played in a ceremony honoring a Navy Vietnam Veteran who died on the USS Ranger in 1962 during the Vietnam Conflict.  It took 46 years for his name to be placed on the Wall in DC and now on the Vietnam Veteran’s Memorial Obelisk at Haleiwa Beach Park on Oahu’s North Shore. This was a special event for both the band and SAMS members as we honored this Navy Airman.  His friend Ben Ishida fought government red tape for 46 years to get his friend the recognition he deserved.

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Post 808 Update (July 2011)

Presidential Unit Citation Recognizes 1/27th Wolfhound Gallantry in Vietnam

Post 808’s newest S.A.M.S. member, retired Army Lieutenant Colonel Howard Lavy was responsible for obtaining a Presidential Unit Citation (PUC) for his former unit, Company A, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 2d Brigade Combat Team, 25th Infantry Division for service in combat 45 years ago in the jungles of South Vietnam.  In an interview with the 2d BCT Public Affairs Office, retired Command Sergeant Major Leonard Letoto, who was a former first sergeant for the unit tells the story: ““We entered an area (of Vietnam) called Ho Bo Woods with 92 guys. … We left with 32 wounded, and sustained 56 casualties. … It was one of the toughest days, I ever had to serve.”

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Retired Lt. Col. Howard Lavy (center), Co. A, 1st Bn., 27th Inf. Regt., 2nd BCT, 25th ID, ties the PUC to the guidon during a ceremony held at Schofield Barracks, July 8. SCHOFIELD BARRACKS —

The award recognizes the actions of the company and honors the veterans who endured through the battle near Ho Bo Woods and honors all previously unrecognized Wolfhound Soldiers to fought in that battle for A Company in Vietnam.
Retired Lt. Col. Howard Lavy was one of the nine veterans in attendance and helped lead the drive to recognize the unit for its actions on the battlefield.

“We are finally able to recognize the valor and gallantry of the unit, and that’s what it’s all about,” he said. “It’s not me or anyone else; it’s the unit and we all fought together. … Many of us died together, (were) wounded together, (so we) banded together and were able to endure.”

 

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Soldiers from Co. A, 1st Bn., 27th Inf. Regt., 2nd BCT, 25th ID, stand at ease during the PUC ceremony. They listened to veterans retelling the story about the battle at Ho Bo Woods, Vietnam, fought July 19, 1966. Retired Col. Walter Kaneakua, of Hawaii Senator Daniel Inouye’s Office, presented the award, almost 45 years to the day of the initial battle fought July 19, 1966.
“It was originally a search and destroy mission,” Letoto said. “Once we moved into the area and sent in the first platoon, things quickly picked up and it became a tough battle.”
Present day Soldiers taking part in the ceremony see the recognition of their past brothers-in-arms.
“It’s a real honor to be in a ceremony that recognized our past Wolfhound brothers,” said Staff Sgt. Lucas Collins, squad leader, Co. A. “Those guys went above and beyond what was asked of them in Vietnam, and it’s rewarding to see them get recognized. … It really makes me proud to be here today.”

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LTC(ret) Lavy, center  is a member of the Celtic Pipes & Drums of Hawaii.

While that was a good news story, the same battalion, suffered personnel losses in Afghanistan, recently.  I attended and played in the memorial service for five fallen Soldiers of  1st Battalion, 27th Infantry (Wolfhounds) conducted a memorial ceremony, inscribing the names of five members recently lost in battle.

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Soldiers of the 1/27th Infantry, 25th ID (SBCT) prepare to present leis to family members of their fallen comrades, July 15, 2011.
More photos at Easy Smith's Album

 

 

tartan

 Hawaii’s Own Tartan

By Sita MacGregor Menor, Post 808

A contest sponsored by The Caledonian Society of Hawaii during the 1997 Hawaiian Scottish Games resulted in Douglas Herring’s winning design of the Hawaii Tartan. In 2008, the Hawaii State Legislature passed a resolution designating April 6 of each year as “Tartan Day” to recognize the Hawaii State Tartan.

 

The tartan is registered in Scotland with the official Scottish Tartans Authority as the Hawaiian Tartan; complete with the International Tartan Index number, 5163, under the American State Tartan category. 

 

According to designer Douglas Herring, the inspiration for the tartan began with an idea of a blue-green pattern.  According to Doug, the blue color represent the ocean and the sky, the green represent the islands’ foliage, and brown stripes represent the distinctive red and brown earth tones of the Hawaiian soil. Additionally, the brown stripe symbolizes the rich multi-cultural heritage which remains a prominent feature of our “Aloha State.  Red and yellow colors represent both fire and lava which formed the Hawaiian Islands.  They also honor the Hawaiian Ali’i (the chiefs and royalty of the former monarchy).

 

The Hawaii Tartan is intended to be worn by anyone who is Scottish at heart.  Hamish Douglas of Maui Celtic was instrumental in bringing the manufacture of the Hawaii Tartan to fruition.  Hamish is Hawaii’s primary supplier of Hawaii Tartan scarves and accessories.  The tartan can be ordered from Maui Celtic; however, it is also made in kilt-weight wool by Bill James of the Celtic Craft Centre, kilt makers in Scotland. 




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